The birth of a child is a big deal in every part of the world. It is seen as a promise of a future to come, full of hope and joy. There are celebrations and the news draws family, friends, and supporters to the parents, to share their joy. There is usually a party to celebrate the birth and to welcome a new member into the family. All things being equal, the joy of the family continues and is enhanced as the baby develops. Parents, especially have high hopes for their child, waiting to see this child succeed in life and continue their lineage.

For Mary and Joseph, their joy was mixed with sorrow. They knew that the child they were being given to raise was not and would not be like other children of His time. He was special. Prophecies were being fulfilled at His birth and the parents each had angelic visitations. Things were definitely not business as usual.

Fast forward, thousands of years later, the whole world is reminded of the birth of this God-anointed Child annually. Whether it likes it or not, the world is forced to acknowledge the Child who we now know as King, the King of Kings. Yes, maybe the world’s remembrance is driven more by commercial interests than adoration, but nevertheless, He is remembered.

Among the world’s population, in every tribe and tongue, we find true believers, who not only remember the Child but are now crying out for the King, who is to come. They never saw the Child, but they believe that He came, was crucified, died, rose from the dead and lives again, waiting for the time of His reappearing.

As we continue in the joys of the season and its culmination on Christmas Day, let us truly remember the Child, so miraculously born, to fulfill the promises that God had spoken so many years previously. With the added benefit of knowing the story of how He grew up, did ministry, died and rose, let us thank Him for the purpose of His birth, which is the redemption of man and the restoration of man to the position of sonship.

Finally, in the midst of our preparations, the hustle and bustle of shopping, cooking and enjoying family times, let us remember Him, as His faithful and expectant Church, eagerly awaiting His coming. Because He is coming!

As surely as He did the first time, He will come again. May we not be unprepared and hostile, as those that hosted Him the first time. May our lives, loves, choices, faith, and obedience welcome Him. May we be able to call for Him, in all truth, as the waiting Bride, shouting, ‘Come, Lord Jesus!’

Beyond the activities, beyond the cake, the turkey, the many varieties of rice and every good thing, our hearts long for Jesus more than ever before. So we agree with the Spirit to say, “Come!”

Even so, Come, Lord Jesus.

Merry Christmas, Everyone!